When we talk about what it means to see yourself on screen, it is usually assumed that having some aspect of your lived experience reflected in movies and television is a good thing But that doesn’t describe the acute embarrassment I felt – besides the reluctant recognition – when I saw a certain scene in Boogie, in which the main character of the film of the same name sees a tape of a 30-year-old tennis match with his father (Perry Yung), a recording of what Mr. Chin declares “the greatest moment in Asian history”: 17-year-old Michael Chang, who won the French Open Boogie in 1989 – who was born Alfred Chin but prefers his “stripper name” – is a high school senior and Basketball star who was over a decade away from birth at the time of Chang’s landmark win, and he frustratedly tries to argue that certainly the years since then have had something to offer. What about Yao Ming, who flies the flag at the Olympics ? Not American, emphasizes his father. The girl who designed the Vietnam War Memorial? Not bad for Maya Lin, but that was still nothing to become the youngest male player in history to win a Grand Slam. And for all their mutual obsession with basketball, the Chins Juniors and Seniors agree in disdain for Jeremy Lin, who as Mr Chin sniffs, “gave Jesus the honor”

Boogie is the directorial debut of restaurateur and TV personality Eddie Huang, whose 2013 memoir became the basis of Fresh Off the Boat, a sitcom he later turned down to clean up the darker aspects of his childhood film about the NBA – A Taiwanese American queens teenager’s dreams and domestic struggles are a fiction, but it’s also clearly his attempt to get something gritty than FOB and be true to his perspective (Huang also posed in Boogie as the quick-talking Uncle Jackie, who occasionally shows up for advice or bad news about Mr. Chin’s business dealings) The rebellious protagonist, played by Taylor Takahashi, is Huang’s revenge on the Jeremy Lins of the world – with his tattoos, his bragging rights, and the way he starts his publicity for black classmate Eleanor (Taylour Paige) by staring at her gym and then say to her, “You have a pretty vagina” Somehow it works for him, maybe because Takahashi – a 28-year-old Japanese-American who met Huang through a casual basketball league – exudes ease on the screen, even if it is evident that he left his teens behind some time ago.Boogie is both a vehicle for Huang’s frustrations with the stranglehold of minority model stereotypes and a portrayal of his fantasy of an Asian-American lead role – one who fucks (albeit with an outbreak of self-doubt about his tail size) and he plays the ball well Enough to get colleges’ attention even though no scholarship offers The pressure is on Boogie because his family can’t afford to otherwise pay for the school As his mother’s (Pamelyn Chee) anger makes it clear, they can’t even afford to pay their own household bills

Both Huang and I are 80s kids whose ages are closer to Boogie’s father than Boogie himself.As a half-Chinese kid growing up in the suburbs of the Bay Area, I knew nothing about tennis, but still kept Michael Chang in Eye, just as I (and still) had an ongoing awareness of every mixed Asian actor in the business.At the core of this impulse is not just the desire to see yourself, but the longing for used hips, for clout – one Longing That May Be Youthful But Still Powerful In Huang, it’s powerful enough that he never really grew out of it. Watching boogie is wondering if, for Huang, the hardest part of the Asian-American experience is being perceived as uncool Maybe that’s why he allows Mr. Chin, to ponder any perspective the film’s Gen Z protagonist might have: Huang seems humiliating to cling to his own formative memories of Chang’s triumph on a global stage while ignoring the fact that Chang has less in common with boogie than with Jeremy Lin, whom Boogie dismissively describes as a “Jesus freak with more model minority than Asians” “Boogie’s feelings about Asian-American masculinity have an incredibly ill-considered quality, and never more so than in the film’s tense relationship with Blackness”

Boogie is set in the Chinese enclave of Flushing, but it’s the blackness that the main character has to measure himself against. In theory, the dramatic tension in the story has to do with Boogie receiving a scholarship, but in practice it depends whether Boogie can prove himself by beating the best player in town, whose name is Monk and who is played by Pop Smoke in the first and only role of the late rapper It’s not a part that involves a lot of dialogue as Monk rather than Symbolizing the insecurities of Boogie (and Huang) as serving for a character, Boogie stares Monk through the chain link fence around the yard where Monk is paramount, and nearly destroys his burgeoning relationship with Eleanor after he finds out that Monk is hers Former sexual partner was When Boogie has contempt for those he sees as the pursuit of white neighborhood, he views the blackness with a mixture of lust and resentment s Just as Boogie and his father agree that hitting Monk is somehow the solution to the fact that “nobody believes in an Asian basketball player,” Boogie feels the need to emphasize to Eleanor that she will never understand what it’s like to have her Parents hold their victims above your head. She needs to remind him that she is struggling with her own racial trauma. It’s not about finding common ground It is a one-sided demand for recognition of the pain

And certainly at this moment of increasing violence against Asians and Asian Americans there is something understandable about this desire to be seen and to acknowledge experiences with bigotry, marginalization and immigrant struggles.It is a pity that boogie in his idea of ​​what this pain is In Boogie’s defining speech, his protagonist laments the lack of imagination over beef and broccoli, a classic Sino-American take-out dish at the Italians , Greeks and other cultures in his view have their own variations, beef and broccoli have received neighborhoods, as Boogie allows, but it’s another means to discount his community “The Chinese could be so much more if this country weren’t up to us Would reduce beef and broccoli, “concludes t he, a line that reads as astonishingly cheesy as it is sincerely meant

Boogie may focus on a teenager born in the 2000s, but their ideas about Asian-American identity and being Chinese in America are vague, just as they were a few decades ago, and they don’t feel like much having gone through a test in the time that has passed since then.Whatever the desire to get real that the movie was born out of, it ultimately feels like a sign that it is time to grow up. p>

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Boogie

World News – USA – Boogie has to grow up

Source: https://www.vulture.com/article/movie-review-eddie-huangs-boogie.html