Man charged with wanton endangerment over Louisville cop shooting

By Rachel Sharp For Dailymail.com and Megan Sheets For Dailymail.com and Frances Mulraney For Dailymail.com

Published: 16:01 BST, 24 September 2020 | Updated: 17:46 BST, 24 September 2020

The two Louisville cops shot during protests over the Kentucky grand jury’s decision not to bring murder charges against the officers involved in Breonna’s Taylor’s death have been identified, as the suspected gunman faces charges for wanton endangerment. 

Major Aubrey Gregory and Officer Robinson Desroches were injured in the shooting Wednesday night. One of the officers was recovering out of hospital Thursday and the other was also expected to survive the attack.  

Larynzo Johnson, 26, was arrested Wednesday night over the shooting and charged with first-degree assault of a police officer and first-degree wanton endangerment – the latter being the very same charge brought against the only cop to be indicted over Taylor’s slaying. 

Only one officer Brett Hankison was charged in connection to the botched raid that resulted in Taylor being shot six times and killed in her apartment back in March.

Major Aubrey Gregory (left) and Officer Robinson Desroches (right) were shot during protests over the Kentucky grand jury’s decision not to bring murder charges against the officers involved in Breonna’s Taylor’s death

He was handed just three counts of wanton endangerment – a far cry from the murder charges protesters and Taylor’s family demanded.   

The first-degree charge, a Class D felony which carries a penalty of up to five years in prison, relates to Hankison shooting into the neighboring apartments during the incident.

Larynzo Johnson was arrested Wednesday night after the two cops were shot during protests over the grand jury decision

No charges were brought against him in relation to the death of Taylor and the other two officers that fired 22 shots into the black EMT’s home between them were not charged, stoking renewed outrage over Taylor’s death and the handling of the case nationwide.

Johnson was charged with two counts of assault of a police officer and 14 counts of wanton endangerment after he shot at the officers Wednesday night, striking one in the thigh and the other in the abdomen below their bulletproof vest.  

His arrest citation says Johnson ‘intentionally used a handgun to fire multiple bullets at officers… causing serious physical injury’ to two cops struck by the gunfire, reported the Courier Journal.  

It is not clear why attempted murder charges have not been filed or whether they could be upgraded following an investigation. 

A total of 127 protesters were arrested during unrest in Taylor’s home state of Louisville last night, with dozens more taken into custody amid demonstrations across America including in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles.  

In Seattle, Washington state, 13 people were arrested on charges including property destruction, resisting arrest, failure to disperse and assault on a police officer after one cop was hit over the head with a baseball bat. 

Meanwhile, shocking footage surfaced online of a Seattle cop pushing a bicycle over the head of a protester who was lying on the ground.     

A protester stands next to a burning pile of trash as tensions boiled over in Louisville’s downtown area on Wednesday night

A burning trash can in Louisville amid a night of protests over the decision not to charge three cops with murder over Taylor’s death in March

Protesters march down the streets of downtown Louisville in outrage that murder charges were not brought against cops involved in Taylor’s slaying

A line of police officers in riot gear stand together and block the path of protesters outraged over the grand jury verdict

Two cops were shot when gunfire rung out and a suspect was taken into custody Wednesday night

Heavily-armed riot police stand guard in a street in downtown Louisville amid protests sparked by a Kentucky grand jury’s decision to clear three officers of charges for the shooting death of Breonna Taylor

Protesters hurl water bottles and profanities at a police building in downtown Louisville on Wednesday night  

By 11pm at least 46 people had been arrested in connection with protests, according to the LMPD

Officers mobilize to round up protesters breaking a city-wide curfew in downtown Louisville on Wednesday night

Protesters pass by a burning pile of trash as tensions boiled over in Louisville’s downtown area on Wednesday night

A crowd of police clad in riot gear wait for orders as protests continued well past curfew on Wednesday night

Officers stand in the street shortly after shots were fired at police resulting in two injured officers

Police officers clad in riot gear form a wall as they move down a street in downtown Louisville searching for curfew-breakers

The map above shows the site where two officers were shot in Louisville on Wednesday night compared with where protesters confronted a line of police around the same time 

Louisville Interim Police Chief Robert Schroeder said the shooting of the two officers took place at Brook Street and Broadway about 8.30pm when officers were responding to a large crowd of demonstrators. 

‘I am very concerned for the safety of our officers,’ said Schroeder at a press conference just after 10pm Wednesday. 

‘Obviously we’ve had two officers shot tonight. That is very serious and a dangerous condition. I think the safety of our officers and the community we serve are of utmost importance.’

President Donald Trump took to Twitter soon after and said he was praying for the officers injured. 

‘The Federal Government stands behind you and is ready to help,’ he tweeted. ‘Spoke to [Governor Andy Beshear] and we are prepared to work together, immediately upon request!’ 

Bystander video showed a group of people walking down a street when gunfire erupted several hundred yards away where police cars were parked with their lights flashing.  

Bystander video showed a group of people walking down a street when gunfire erupted several hundred yards away where police cars were parked with their lights flashing. At least 14 shots rang out at the person holding the camera started running away from the source

The Louisville Metro Police Department confirmed a shooting at Brook Street and Broadway at about 8.30pm Wednesday and said the officers were rushed to an area hospital

Police escort a man out of the area after an officer was shot on Wednesday night

A crowd is seen marching through an underpass after the 9pm curfew went into effect in Louisville

Police officers move past Louisville City Hall as a curfew is implemented at 9pm to disperse protesters

Nightfall gave way to even more violence in the city as fires broke out on the streets 

A couple passes by a bus stop with shattered windows after protests passed through the area on Wednesday night

Police officers stand at a checkpoint in downtown Louisville watching for curfew breakers on Wednesday night

At least 14 shots rang out at the person holding the camera started running away from the source. 

A livestream from the LMPD also captured the first few moments of the shooting before it was cut off. 

Johnson was arrested at 8:40 p.m., according to his arrest citation, which says the suspect ‘showed an extreme indifference to the value of human life’ and put officers at risk of death or serious injury. 

Witnesses identified him as the man seen firing a gun at the cops and running from the scene and he was armed at the time of his arrest, the court documents say.  

He is being held at Louisville Metro Corrections and is scheduled to be arraigned Friday morning. 

Two of the 127 people arrested in the city last night were reporters with the Daily Caller who were charged with misdemeanors related to breaking curfew and unlawful assembly after not dispersing when ordered by cops.  

Armed National Guard members are seen armed and waiting in a vehicle after they were deployed by the governor

Protesters walk away from police with their hands up near the scene where two officers were shot on Wednesday night

A large law enforcement presence remained at the scene of the officer shooting for hours after a suspect was detained

A man removes a cooler box with water after protesters set fire in front of the Louis D Brandeis Hall of Justice

A police officer stands behind a vehicle downtown as protests erupted following the grand jury announcement 

A fire burns near a food station set up to keep protesters nourished during demonstrations on Wednesday night

We are all on the ground right now and police are taking people and putting them in zip tie cuffs pic.twitter.com/eIJJF1t1Ub

Charges of wanton endangerment are brought when a person is found to have recklessly engaged in conduct, without concern for human life, that puts a person at risk of death or serious injury. 

‘A person is guilty of wanton endangerment in the first degree when, under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life, he wantonly engages in conduct which creates a substantial danger of death or serious physical injury to another person,’ state law says. 

The three counts of wanton endangerment were brought against Officer Brett Hankison after the bullets he fired inside Taylor’s apartment traveled into a neighboring apartment. 

Louisville was thrown into turmoil after a grand jury decided not to charge the officers. Instead, it handed down its decision to indict just one of the officers involved in Taylor’s killing, Brett Hankison, on charges of wanton endangerment for shooting into the homes of the 26-year-old EMT’s neighbors when they executed a warrant on March 13. 

Hundreds of protesters began marching through the streets immediately after the announcement. Tensions quickly boiled over as protesters confronted lines of police officers who fired pepper balls and used wooden batons to drive them back. 

Hundreds of demonstrators also took to the streets of cities like New York, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Las Vegas following the decision.   

Cellphone footage captured the moment a cop in Seattle pushes his bike over the head of a protester during demonstrations in the city.

The shocking video shows a wall of cops cycling and pushing bikes or walking down the road. 

A protester is seen lying on the road as a cop wheels his bike over their head.

Seattle Police said it was aware of the video and had referred the incident to the city’s Office of Police Accountability for investigation. 

One officer was struck over the head with a baseball bat, causing their helmet to crack, police said. 

Clashes also erupted between protesters and law enforcement in other parts of America with authorities unleashing chemical agents on Atlanta demonstrators after they tried to climb on a SWAT vehicle. 

In Buffalo, New York, a protester was taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries after a driver in a pickup truck accelerated into a group of demonstrators outside City Hall striking a person on a bicycle.

Over in Portland, which has been the scene of ongoing protests calling for an end to police brutality and racism since the ‘murder’ of George Floyd by a cop in Minneapolis on Memorial Day, police declared a riot after some demonstrators set fire to a police precinct.  

Wednesday’s grand jury announcement marked the end of a four-month investigation into the death of Taylor, who was shot and killed over six months ago by officers who stormed into her home with a narcotics warrant. 

The EMT’s death set off months of protests, policy changes and a call for the three Louisville Metro Police Department officers who performed the raid to be criminally charged.  

The grand jury chose to charge Hankison with three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment. The Class D felony, which carries a penalty of up to five years in prison, relates to Hankinson shooting into the neighboring apartments during the raid, not Taylor’s death. 

Hankinson was fired by the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated policy by ‘wantonly and blindly’ firing his gun during the raid. 

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present at the time of the fatal operation, were not charged. 

In Jefferson Square Park in Louisville, people were seen breaking down in tears and screaming when the decision arrived as law enforcement helicopters surveyed the scene from above. 

Cellphone footage captured the moment a cop in Seattle pushes his bike over the head of a protester during demonstrations in the city

The shocking video shows a wall of cops cycling and pushing bikes or walking down the road while a protester is seen lying on the road. The cop then wheels his bike over the person’s head

Protesters march against police brutality in Los Angeles Wednesday night as outrage spread across America over the grand jury decision 

People waved banners and raised their fists in outrage over the decision not to bring murder charges against the cops

The Kentucky grand jury handed down its decision to indict just one of the officers involved in Taylor’s killing, Brett Hankison

In New York, hundreds of protesters marched through the streets as night fell after Hankison was charged with wanton endangerment for shooting into the homes of the 26-year-old EMT’s neighbors when they executed a warrant on March 13

Protesters crossed Manhattan Bridge after marching from a rally held at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn

The crowd of New Yorkers marched through the city as night fell in a show of anger at the Kentucky grand jury decision

People wore t-shirts emblazoned with Breonna Taylor’s name and held aloft banners reading ‘Stop killing black people’

Hundreds gathered in NYC following Wednesday’s announcement. Taylor, 26, was killed on March 13 when Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove and Brett Hankison burst down the door to her home in Louisville and shot her six times

More than six months on from her killing, a grand jury returned a decision Wednesday on possible charges against the three cops, choosing to indict just one of the officers Hankison on the lesser charges of wanton endangerment

Protesters carry a banner reading ‘Protect black women’ as they walk through the streets of the Big Apple 

The Empire State Building is lit up as demonstrators walk through New York City in the wake of Wednesday’s decision

In Chicago, Illinois, a protester carries a sign in honor of black EMT Taylor who was killed by cops in March

‘That’s it?’ some questioned, while others called to burn the city down. ‘We don’t get no murder charges?’ another asked. 

Many were angered that Hankison, the sole cop charged with three counts of ‘wanton endangerment’ of Taylor’s neighbors, was required to post just a $15,000 bond. 

‘It tells people, cops can kill you in the sanctity of your own home,’ Linda Sarsour, a Palestinian American activist, told the New York Times of the decision. 

‘It’s unjustifiable,’ added Desaray Yarbrough, a Louisville resident who came out to watch the march as it went by. 

Police clash with protesters marching through the streets of Louisville after a grand jury chose not to indict three officers in the death of Breonna Taylor on Wednesday afternoon

Hundreds of people took to the streets on Wednesday afternoon to decry the grand jury’s decision

A woman reacts with anguish after a Kentucky grand jury handed down its decision in the death of Breonna Taylor 

Police officers carrying batons chase down a protester during a march in downtown Louisville on Wednesday afternoon

Police were seen detaining multiple people hours ahead of the city’s 9pm curfew going into effect

A police officer detains a protester in downtown Louisville as demonstrations kicked off on Wednesday afternoon 

A protester offers water to a man as he is detained on the ground by police officers clad in riot gear

Two protesters are thrown to the ground by police during a march in downtown Louisville on Wednesday afternoon

A woman screams as a police officer attempts to take a bike away from her during clashes between cops and protesters

Protesters quickly came together to begin marching, despite the incoming 72-hour curfew and large parts of the city being closed down. 

Members of far-right groups including the Boogaloo Boys and the Proud Boys were seen fully armed as they made their way downtown to challenge protesters in the afternoon, but appeared to have dispersed by nightfall. 

By 2.15pm, the Times reported that 250 protesters were already marching with two dozen police cruisers in pursuit. 

The group initially march through the closed sections of the city as they chanted: ‘If we don’t get it, shut it down.’ 

Video showed a U-Haul van pulling up to the edge of the barricaded area and offloading a cache of supplies including shields and signs that read: ‘Abolish the police’ and ‘Abolition now’.  

Earlier a group of 150 people had blocked an intersection of Broadway and 6th Street, just outside a barricade that authorities have established around city buildings to keep protesters away. 

Tensions already began to mount as police blocked the crowd from accessing certain roads and leaders tried to keep the group together. 

Fired Louisville detective Brett Hankison (left) was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid that killed Breonna Taylor (right) on the night of March 13 

At around 3pm the crowd had grown to several hundred people as they stopped to organize at an intersection with shields to the front. 

Some protesters were seen knocking over tables and chairs in front of a restaurant before meeting with a white citizen group who were patrolling in front of businesses to keep them secure.

Other videos showed demonstrators hurling insults and water bottles at police officers who linked arms to push back the crowds. 

At about 4.30pm officers began telling protesters that they were engaging in an unlawful assembly and ordered them to disperse immediately.  

‘If you do not do so we may dispense chemical agents and you will be arrested,’ officers told residents via loud speaker.  

Cops were photographed aggressively arresting several protesters by throwing them to the ground and holding them down as they were placed in handcuffs.   

The situation escalated as the curfew drew near and officers began telling people to head home. 

Protesters set fire to piles of trash and Gov Beshear deployed 500 National Guard members to help enforce a city-wide 9pm curfew.   

The two cops were shot around 8:30 pm and, soon after, Gov Beshear tweeted a video of himself urging protesters to pack up for the night.  

‘Sadly we have seen at least one individual turn what were nonviolent ways of expressing ourselves into the shooting of at least two law enforcement officers,’ Beshear said. ‘We know that the answer to violence is never violence, and we are thinking about those two officers and their families tonight.

 ‘So I’m asking everybody, please, go home. Go home tonight. There will be many times over the coming days where there will be an opportunity to be heard, and so many people are listening right now.’

But protesters ignored Beshear’s plea and stayed on the streets as police ramped up efforts to corral them. 

The Daily Caller reported that two of its correspondents were detained on a sidewalk alongside dozens of others who were placed in zip ties. 

By 11pm at least 46 people had been arrested in connection with protests, according to the LMPD. 

Protesters hold up their hands as they face off against a line of police officers clad in riot gear

Hundreds of people who gathered in Jefferson Square Park to hear the grand jury’s decision reacted with anger and frustration after learning that just one of the three officers involved in Taylor’s death would face charges 

Protesters carrying ‘Abolish the police’ signs hold their fists in the air during a march in Louisville on Wednesday afternoon

A police officer looks on as people react to the grand jury’s decision on Breonna Taylor’s death

People are detained in Louisville after a demonstration over Breonna Taylor’s shooting death on Wednesday afternoon 

People react to the grand jury decision on Breonna Taylor’s death as hundreds gather to protest

Louisville began preparing for potential unrest last week after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said the grand jury decision would be released ‘soon’. 

City officials began erecting barricades around Jefferson Square Park – which has been at the center of 100 days of protests over Taylor’s death – and boarded up police and federal buildings in anticipation of protests.  

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency on Tuesday night and announced a 72-hour curfew for the city beginning at 9pm, with exceptions for those going to work or to seek medical treatment. 

‘I urge everybody to choose peaceful and lawful protest,’ Fischer, a white Democrat, said shortly before Cameron’s announcement. 

‘This is obviously a really important time for our city. I want us to think about our kids and our grandkids and get this right.’  

After the announcement, Fischer pleaded for peace, saying: ‘Let’s turn to each other, not on each other.’  

Four wheeled military vehicles enter the city ahead of a 9pm curfew Wednesday that will stay in place for 72 hours 

Protesters cried out in anger as the grand jury decision was announced and a large march begins

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has called out ‘celebrities, influencers and activists’ for weighing in on the grand jury findings in the Breonna Taylor case

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron called out ‘celebrities, influencers and activists’ for weighing in on the grand jury findings in the Breonna Taylor case, saying they will ‘try to tell us how to feel.’

Cameron, who is on Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee shortlist, was speaking at a press conference on Wednesday in which he announced that a grand jury grand jury brought no charges against Louisville police for the killing of Breonna Taylor in March.

‘Each [case] is unique and cannot be compared,’ Cameron said, going on to predict an inevitable outcry from celebrities over the grand jury findings. 

‘There will be celebrities, influencers, and activists who having never lived in Kentucky, will try to tell us how to feel, suggesting they understand the facts of this case and that they know our community and the commonwealth better than we do. But they don’t,’ he said. 

‘Let’s not give into their attempts to influence our thinking or capture our emotions. At the end of the day, if is up to us. We live here together,’ Cameron added.

‘Our reaction to the truth is the society we want to be,’ he said. ‘Do we really want the truth? Or do we want a truth that fits our narrative? Do we want the facts? Are we content to blindly accept our own version of events? We, as a community, must make this decision.’

Cameron, a Republican, is considered a rising star in the party, and was praised by President Donald Trump on Wednesday, who said he handled the Taylor case ‘very well.’

The grand jury indicted one of the three officers who fired during the March 13 raid, charging Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment for alleged wild shots that entered a neighboring apartment.

The other two officers were not charged, with the grand jury finding that their actions were justified after Taylor’s boyfriend first opened fire, striking one officer. 

Celebrities including actress Viola Davis, ‘Schitt’s Creek’ creator and star Dan Levy, actor George Clooney, rapper Common, and Los Angeles Lakers star LeBron James have expressed outrage at the grand jury decision.

‘BLACK LIVES MATTER !!! Cannot be said enough times,’ the Oscar-winning actress, 55, went on, also reposting messages from the NAACP and TV One.

‘Scandal’ star Kerry Washington expressed her anger while sharing a post by the ACLU, which said: ‘Today’s verdict is not accountability and not close to justice.’

Later she criticized Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron for acting politically, tweeting: ‘Daniel Cameron is on Donald Trump´s short list as replacement of #RGB on the Supreme Court. The same man who decided to not charge the officers responsible for killing #BreonnaTaylor. Vote.’ 

Levy wrote in a tweet that he was ‘Disgusted. Enraged. Heartbroken,’ over the decision, and encouraged his followers to donate to a bail fund for protesters in Louisville. ‘Please contribute if you can. Justice should not be a luxury,’ Levy wrote.

‘The justice system I was raised to believe in holds people responsible for their actions,’ Clooney said in a statement to Deadline.

‘Her name was Breonna Taylor and she was shot to death in her bed by 3 white police officers, who will not be charged with any crime for her death. I know the community. I know the commonwealth. And I was taught in the schools and churches of Kentucky what is right and what is wrong. I’m ashamed of this decision,’ said Clooney.

NBA star James tweeted: ‘I’ve been lost for words today! I’m devastated, hurt, sad, mad! We want Justice for Breonna yet justice was met for her neighbors apartment walls and not her beautiful life. Was I surprised at the verdict. Absolutely not but d***it I was & still am hurt and heavy hearted!’  

Director Ava DuVernay sent a compassionate message to Breonna’s loved ones, tweeting: ‘God bless Breonna’s family and all who knew and loved her. 

‘Her tragic death compounded by the violence of silence and inaction by the city she called home is more than any of them should have to endure.

Give back: ‘Disgusted. Enraged. Heartbroken,’ Dan Levy wrote, then urging followers to contribute to the Louisville Community Bail Fund

Common shared a poignant quote from writer James Baldwin, tweeting: ”To be a Negro in this country and to be relatively conscious is to be in a state of rage almost all of the time.’ James Baldwin. #BreonnaTaylor.’

He followed up with another searing quote from Malcolm X, which said: ‘If you stick a knife in my back 9 in and pull it out 6 in, there’s no progress. 

‘If you pull it all the way out, that’s not progress. The progress is healing the wound that the blow made. They won’t even admit the knife is there.’

MLK’s daughter Bernice King herself shared her grief for Taylor’s family, writing: ‘Praying for Breonna’s mother and family. Because they knew and loved her before her name became a hashtag.’ 

Top Chef host/judge Padma Lakshmi wrote: ‘What we saw today was not justice. May Breonna Taylor’s spirit rest in power as we all continue the fight #justiceforbreonnataylor.’

Actress Yvette Nicole Brown was incensed, writing: ‘No. Officers. Charged. In. The. Killing. Of. #BreonnaTaylor. One. Was. Charged. For. Endangering. But. NOT. Killing. Her. Neighbors. #MakeMeWannaHollerAndThrowUpBothMyHands.’

Singer/This Is Us star Mandy Moore was speechless, telling the public: ‘I don´t have the words. #BreonnaTaylor and her family deserve justice.’

On Instagram Mandy shared a portrait Breonna with the caption voicing her support for Black Lives Matter, captioning the post: ‘Today’s news is devastating and infuriating and indicative of a miserably broken system. 

‘Breonna Taylor’s life had value. She and her family deserve justice. Black women matter. Black Lives matter.’

In New York City, hundreds of people descended on the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, where they took a knee in Taylor’s honor and listened to various activists speak, and outside Grand Central Station in Manhattan.  

To the north in Buffalo, a protester was hit by a pickup truck during a demonstration in the city’s Niagara Square. The protester was hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries, officials said, and the driver of the truck was pulled over. 

In Illinois, Gov J.B. Pritzker said had spoken to the National Guard about being prepared for protests and was in touch with Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago.  

About 300 people gathered in Palmer Square Park on Chicago’s northwest side before setting off on a march Wednesday evening, chanting Taylor’s name. The march was monitored by police officers on bicycles. 

Other demonstrators gathered in downtown’s Millennium Park chanting demands for justice as passing motorists on Michigan Avenue honked their horns.

Activist priest the Rev Michael Pfleger told protesters gathered in the middle of an intersection that they should peacefully let those who represent the status quo know of their unhappiness with the Taylor decision.

‘We’re here tonight because we do care,’ Pfleger said. ‘And we’re here because we want to say: ‘We object and we don’t accept it. Somebody has to be held accountable.”

In Atlanta, Georgia State Police were seen deploying tear gas canisters on protesters who refused to disperse. 

Another large crowd formed in the nation’s capital of Washington DC as city officials started shutting down streets.   

NEW YORK: Protesters outside the Barclays Center call for justice in the murder of Breonna Taylor 

WASHINGTON DC: A massive crowd made their way through the National Mall chanting Breonna Taylor’s name

Fired Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid on the night of March 13

Jefferson County Circuit Judge Annie O’Connell on Wednesday announced the grand jury’s decision to charge former detective Brett Hankison with three counts of wanton endangerment in connection to the police raid on the night of March 13. 

The first-degree charge, a Class D felony which carries a penalty of up to five years in prison, relates to Hankinson shooting into the neighboring apartments during the incident, not Taylor’s death.  

Hankinson was fired by the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated policy by ‘wantonly and blindly’ firing his gun during the raid.  

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present at the time of the fatal operation, were not charged.

State Attorney General Daniel Cameron addressed the long-awaited decision shortly after the announcement in a news conference in Frankfort. 

He gave a detailed account of the months-long investigation into the events leading up to deadly shooting, which he said had been pieced together by ballistics reports, 911 calls, and witness interviews, due to the lack of bodycam footage. 

But Cameron, who is the state’s first Black attorney general, said that the officers were not charged because they acted in self-defense after Taylor’s boyfriend fired at them. 

Cameron is one of 20 names on Donald Trump’s list to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left open by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 

‘I certainly understand the pain that has been brought about by the tragic loss of Miss Taylor. I understand that as an attorney general … I understand that as a black man,’ Cameron told reporters. 

‘This team, myself, and the representatives of the Attorney General’s office have taken a lot of criticism and scrutiny. But that scrutiny in many ways was misplaced because there was not a day that people in this office didn’t go to sleep thinking about this case. 

Louisville police have declared a state of emergency ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s announcement about whether he will charge officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor (pictured)

Officers Myles Cosgrove (left) and John Mattingly (right) who were present during the police raid on March 13, were not charged on Wednesday. Hankison was fired from the LMPD while the other two officers were placed on administrative assignment 

‘Criminal law is not meant to respond to every sorrow and grief, and that is true here. But my heart breaks for the loss of Miss Taylor,’ the AG said. 

Investigators believe Cosgrove was responsible for firing the bullet that took Taylor’s life. Taylor was shot at least five times after officers barged into her apartment while acting on a search warrant for a drug investigation. 

Her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire when police burst in, hitting Mattingly. Walker was charged with attempted murder of a police officer, but prosecutors later dropped the charge.

Walker had told police he heard knocking but didn’t know who was coming into the home and fired in self-defense. 

Cameron said Cosgrove and Mattingly were not charged after investigators determined their actions were justified because Walker opened fire.

‘According to Kentucky law, the use of force by (Officers Jonathan) Mattingly and (Myles) Cosgrove was justified to protect themselves,’ he said. ‘This justification bars us from pursuing criminal charges in Miss Breonna Taylor’s death.’

The raid had been widely reported by the media as a ‘no-knock’ warrant however, further investigations later proved the cops had knocked before entering.  

Walker had also told investigators he did hear knocking, but maintained the cops had not identify themselves as police. 

They knocked on Taylor’s apartment door and announced their presence outside, which Cameron said was corroborated by a neighbor who witnessed the arrival.  

Getting no answer, Cameron said police officers ‘breached the door’ and gained entry into the apartment. 

Mattingly entered first, and at the end of a corridor saw Taylor and with Walker who was pointing a gun.

Walker fired, injuring Mattingly in the thigh. Mattingly returned fire, and his colleagues began shooting soon after, Cameron said. Hankison fired 10 bullets, Cameron said.

Six bullets hit Taylor, though there is no ‘conclusive’ evidence that any came from Hankinson’s gun, Cameron said. Bullets fired by Hankison traveled into a neighboring apartment.  

The three officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor fired 32 times after barging into her apartment, but only one shot was determined to be fatal, investigators found.

The Jefferson County grand jury on Wednesday announced the results of its inquiry into the death of 26-year-old EMT, who was killed in her apartment during a police raid on March 13.  

Louisville Officer Brett Hankison, who was fired in June, was charged with three counts of wanton endangerment for firing into Taylor’s neighbors’ homes. 

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present during the deadly raid, were not indicted. 

In a press conference shortly after the grand jury’s decision, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron gave a detailed account of the sequence of events, which he said was pieced together by ballistics reports, 911 calls, and witness interviews, due to the lack of bodycam footage.  

The investigation shed light into Taylor’s final moments, revealing she was shot a total of six times while standing in the hallway of her home alongside boyfriend Kenneth Walker.

In the early hours of March 13, Louisville police officers entered apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive, firing 32 times. Breonna Taylor was shot six times, but only one was determined to be fatal

Earlier reports had said Taylor was sleeping in bed when officers barged in and opened fire. 

It also confirmed cops did indeed knock after serving a warrant at apartment 4 of 3003 Springfield Drive in the early hours of March 13. 

According to investigators’ findings, Taylor was shot a total of six times, but medical evidence indicated that only one shot was fatal. 

‘Further medical evidence shows Ms Taylor would have died from the fatal shot within a few seconds to two minutes after being struck,’ Cameron said.   

Mattingly was the only officer to enter the apartment, where he said he found Walker holding a gun. 

‘In his statement [Mattingly] says that the male was holding a gun, arms extended, in a shooting stance,’ Cameron said. 

‘Sergeant Mattingly saw the man’s gun fire, heard a boom and immediately knew he was shot as a result of feeling heat in his upper thigh.’

Cameron confirmed Walker shot Mattingly in the leg and there was no evidence to support the cop was hit by friendly fire from other officers. 

During the shooting, Mattingly fired six shots, Cosgrove fired 16, and Hankinson fired 10, according to the report. 

Crime scene photos from the investigation show a number of shell casings in and near the EMT’s apartment after she was shot dead by police on March 13

Bullet holes and blood smeared on the walls could be seen in one evidence photo from inside Taylor’s apartment after she was shot dead

‘Sergeant Mattingly returned fire down the hallway. Mattingly fired six shots. Almost simultaneously, detective Cosgrove also in the doorway, shot 16 times. This all took place in a matter of seconds,’ Cameron said. ‘In total, six bullets struck Ms Taylor.’

Meanwhile, Detective Hankison, who was the only cop charged in the case, had fired his weapon ten times including from an outside sliding glass door and through a bedroom window. 

‘Some bullets traveled through apartment 4 and into apartment 3 before some exited that apartment,’ Cameron said. 

‘At the time, three residents of apartment 3  were at home including a male, a pregnant female, and a child.

‘There is no conclusive evidence that any bullets fired from detective Hankison’s weapon struck Ms Taylor,’ Cameron said. 

The AG said initial ballistics reports were unable to determined which of the three officers fired the shot that killed Taylor.

Cameron then commissioned the FBI Crime lab to conduct a separate analysis to see if they reached the same results. 

‘Our officers looked at both reports to determine if there were major differences in the procedures used by each lab that would have led the FBI to identify who fired the fatal shot. 

‘Both law enforcement agencies used similar equipment and analysis. Each lab is highly respected for their work. 

‘There was nothing our investigators could point to nor anything provided by the respective agencies that directly explains why one lab made the call while another did not,’ Cameron said. 

The charges stem from Hankison’s bullets travelling into a neighboring apartment when he and two other officers opened fire. Pictured above are the bullet holes found in Taylor’s apartment 

President Donald Trump praised Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s ‘fantastic’ handling of the Breonna Taylor case after a grand jury indicted a single officer in connection with her killing. 

Trump called Cameron ‘really brilliant’ and a ‘star’ when asked about the result of the attorney general’s investigation on Wednesday afternoon.  

It came after Cameron announced that fired officer Brett Hankison had been indicted on three charges of wanton endangerment for the botched raid that killed 26-year-old Taylor on March 13. 

The charges related to Hankison shooting into the homes of Taylor’s neighbors, not her death. The other two officers involved in the raid were not charged.  

The grand jury decision was met with immediate backlash as hundreds of protesters began marching through downtown Louisville and clashing with police. 

Trump, who has repeatedly railed against Black Lives Matter protesters, applauded Kentucky Gov Andy Beshear’s decision to deploy the National Guard as tensions mounted in the city.   

President Donald Trump (left) praised Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron (right) for his ‘fantastic’ handling of the Breonna Taylor case at a press conference on Wednesday after a grand jury indicted a single officer in connection with her killing

The president’s press conference came to an abrupt end when he said he had to take an ’emergency phone call’ as a reporters tried to ask him more questions about the Taylor case.  

‘Mr. President, just one more question if I can about Breonna Taylor. People are protesting in the streets. What is your message to that?’ a reporter asked right before Trump walked out. 

Trump briefly addressed the case earlier in the afternoon, but punted when asked if he believed justice had been served.  

The president spoke instead about his own record – once again comparing it to Abraham Lincoln’s – and said he would comment on the case later. 

A reporter had asked Trump: ‘Do you believe that justice was served in he Breonna Taylor case in Kentucky, and what is your message to the black community who believe that perhaps justice was not served by the decision which was rendered by the decision that was rendered by the grand jury in Kentucky?’  

He responded: ‘Well, my message is that I love the black community. And I’ve done more for the black community than any other president. And I say, with the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln,’ Trump said, before rattling off accomplishments, some of which built on existing programs or included Democratic buy-in.

‘And mean that with opportunities zones and with criminal justice reform, with prison reform, with what we’ve done for historically black universities, colleges, schools, what we’ve done – nobody has done more. 

‘Abraham Lincoln, let’s give him the nod, but beyond that, nobody’s done more. I love the black community.’ 

He steered clear of any substantive language on the verdict itself, as authorities in Louisville declared a curfew and lined the streets to quell unrest.  

‘I don’t know enough about it. I heard the decision was just made. We’ve been together here, and so we haven’t discussed it. But after I see what the decision is, I will have a comment on it,’ Trump said.

Joe Biden made vague remarks when asked about the grand jury decision on a tarmac in Charlotte, North Carolina, on Wednesday evening (pictured)

Kamala Harris also declined to offer her opinion on the indictment, saying: ‘I haven’t read it fully yet, but there’s no question that Breonna Taylor and her family deserve justice yesterday, today and tomorrow so I’ll review it’

Rival Joe Biden made similarly vague remarks when asked about the grand jury decision on a tarmac in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

The Democratic presidential nominee claimed he hadn’t received enough information to comment fully but said: ‘My heart goes out to [Taylor’s] mother.’

‘Do not sully her memory or her mother’s by engaging in any violence. It’s totally inappropriate for that to happen,’ Biden said. ‘She wouldn’t want it, nor would her mother, so I hope they do that.’ 

‘I haven’t read it fully yet, but there’s no question that Breonna Taylor and her family deserve justice yesterday, today and tomorrow so I’ll review it,’ said the Senate Judiciary Committee member.

Harris tweeted back in June: ‘The officers who murdered Breonna Taylor nearly three months ago still have not been charged. We can’t forget about Black women in our quest for justice.’ 

– March 13: Officers serving a narcotics warrant fatally shoot Taylor in her home in Louisville, Kentucky.

– March 13, hours later: Police announce the arrest of Kenneth Walker in the wounding of an officer during an exchange of gunfire; Taylor is left unidentified at the news conference, described as ‘an unresponsive woman who was later pronounced dead.’

– March, April: The shooting stays out of the headlines as the COVID-19 pandemic spreads in the U.S.

– April 27, Taylor’s family files wrongful death lawsuit against police department and city, challenging the police narrative.

– May 13: Top Louisville prosecutor Tom Wine recuses himself from reviewing police investigation, Attorney General Daniel Cameron named as special prosecutor.  

– May 22: Prosecutors announce they will drop attempted murder charges against Walker, who shot at officers in his girlfriend’s home.

– May 28: Walker’s anguished 911 call is released, three days after the death of George Floyd at the hands of police in Minnesota, sparking large protests in Louisville.

– June 1: Fischer fires Police Chief Steve Conrad after officers failed to turn on body cameras in shooting of barbecue cook David McAtee during protests in Louisville.

– June 11: Louisville Metro Council unanimously passes ‘Breonna´s Law’ which bans use of no knock warrants.

– June 14: Pop star Beyoncé writes Attorney General Daniel Cameron, urging him to charge police officers.

– June 23: Officer Brett Hankison, one of 3 officers who fired shots the night of Taylor’s death, is fired for ‘blindly’ firing into Taylor´s apartment.

– June 25: Celebrities join hundreds of demonstrators outside state Capitol calling on Cameron to charge officers.

– June 28: Photographer Tyler Gerth is fatally shot at site of ongoing protests in downtown Louisville.

– September  5: Hundreds peacefully protest outside Kentucky Derby, urging Cameron to criminally charge the officers.

– September 7: Fischer names Yvette Gentry, first Black woman to lead Louisville Police department, as interim chief beginning Oct. 1.

– September 15: City announces civil settlement providing Taylor´s family with $12 million and promising police reforms.

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News – Man charged with wanton endangerment over Louisville cop shooting